River Ayr fishermen left furious after herd of cows caused pollution blight with problems running for miles

Rogue farmers are allowing their beasts to charge into a tributary of the river and trample in muck at will causing anglers to pack up.

Herds of cows caused a pollution blight on the River Ayr to the fury of salmon fishers.

Just a week ago we told how much the river had improved for fishing this year, with up to 50 times the number of salmon.

But angler and river protection bosses were wringing their hands in fury at the weekend.

Rogue farmers are allowing their beasts to charge into a tributary of the river and trample in muck at will.
An incident on Saturday caused pollution for MILES downsteam after cattle hit the water.

It led to HUNDREDS of anglers packing up and going home at the height of the season.

Using a drone, the Ayrshire Rivers Trust has pinpointed a spot on the Bogend Burn near Catrine.

Another troublesome crossing which has already been reported to environmental agency SEPA and nothing done may also be to blame.

River groups want SEPA to take direct action against the farmers.

Ayrshire Rivers Trust manager Stuart Brabbs sad:

“SEPA is the regulator and has to take action.

“A couple of farms have allowed the burn and the whole river downsteam to be contaminated with diffuse pollution.

“There are plenty of salmon in the river but all the anglers picked up their rods and went home when they saw the mess.”

“I am so disappointed as there has been so much effort put in my SEPA, ourselves and others to try and address this and we still see it.”

“Cattle poaching in the river bring in soil and whatever fertiliser natural or otherwise is on them.
“The water turns from clear to a brown silty mess.”

“This silt goes on to the river bed and stops eggs hatching at spawning time.”

“This is what kills fish.”

By noon on Saturday most of the river had been impacted.   ART were alerted at 8am and Stuart Brabbs immediately set about capturing it on film.  He posted the results on the trust’s website and said the vast majority of people – except a few agricultural contractors – were “appalled” at what they saw.

Kevin Macnaught from SEPA said:

“We received complaints on Saturday August 5 regarding the presence of silt in the River Ayr. We are currently carrying out an investigation into this incident.

“SEPA is continuing to work with land managers to mitigate rural diffuse pollution within the scope of our regulatory powers.

“We would like to remind the public to contact our Pollution Hotline on 0800 807060 to report any potential pollution incidents.”

 

Source: Daily Record 14th August 2017